TIPS AND TRICKS FOR JAVASCRIPT BEGINNERS
Published On: Jul 14
#javascript#beginners#webdev

In this article, I’ll share a set of JavaScript tips, tricks, and best practices that should be known by all JavaScript developers regardless of their browser/engine or the SSJS (Server Side JavaScript) interpreter.

Covered Topics are :-

1. References,
2. Objects,
3. Arrays

References

  • 1.1 Use const for all of your references; avoid using var.

Why? This ensures that you can’t reassign your references, which can lead to bugs and difficult to comprehend code.

// bad way to write
var a = 1;
var b = 2;
// this is the good way to write avoid using var
const a = 1;
const b = 2;
  • 1.2 If you must reassign references, use let instead of var.

Why? let is block-scoped rather than function-scoped like var.

// bad
var count = 1;
if (true) {
  count += 1;
}

// good, use the let.
let count = 1;
if (true) {
  count += 1;
}
  • 1.3 Note that both let and const are block-scoped.
// const and let only exist in the blocks they are defined in.
{
  let a = 1;
  const b = 1;
}
console.log(a); // ReferenceError
console.log(b); // ReferenceError

Objects

  • 2.1 Use the literal syntax for object creation.
// bad
const item = new Object();

// good
const item = {};
  • 2.2 Use computed property names when creating objects with dynamic property names.

Why? They allow you to define all the properties of an object in one place.

function getKey(k) {
  return `a key named ${k}`;
}

// bad
const obj = {
  id: 5,
  name: 'Tony Stark',
};
obj[getKey('enabled')] = true;

// good
const obj = {
  id: 5,
  name: 'Tony Stark',
  [getKey('enabled')]: true,
};

  • 2.3 Use object method shorthand.
// bad
const atom = {
  value: 1,

  addValue: function (value) {
    return atom.value + value;
  },
};

// good
const atom = {
  value: 1,

  addValue(value) {
    return atom.value + value;
  },
};
  • 2.4 Use property value shorthand.

Why? It is shorter and descriptive.

const tonyStark = 'Tony Stark';

// bad
const obj = {
  tonyStark: tonyStark,
};

// good
const obj = {
  tonyStark,
};

  • 2.5 Group your shorthand properties at the beginning of your object declaration.

Why? It’s easier to tell which properties are using the shorthand.

const anakinSkywalker = 'Anakin Skywalker';
const lukeSkywalker = 'Luke Skywalker';

// bad
const obj = {
  episodeOne: 1,
  twoJediWalkIntoACantina: 2,
  lukeSkywalker,
  episodeThree: 3,
  mayTheFourth: 4,
  anakinSkywalker,
};

// good
const obj = {
  lukeSkywalker,
  anakinSkywalker,
  episodeOne: 1,
  twoJediWalkIntoACantina: 2,
  episodeThree: 3,
  mayTheFourth: 4,
};
  • 2.6 Only quote properties that are invalid identifiers.

Why? In general, we consider it subjectively easier to read. It improves syntax highlighting and is also more easily optimized by many JS engines.

// bad
const bad = {
  'foo': 3,
  'bar': 4,
  'data-blah': 5,
};

// good
const good = {
  foo: 3,
  bar: 4,
  'data-blah': 5,
};
  • 2.7 Do not call Object.prototype methods directly, such as hasOwnProperty, propertyIsEnumerable, and isPrototypeOf.

Why? These methods may be shadowed by properties on the object in question - consider { hasOwnProperty: false } - or, the object may be a null object (Object.create(null)).

// bad
console.log(object.hasOwnProperty(key));

// good
console.log(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, key));

// best
const has = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty; // cache the lookup once, in module scope.
console.log(has.call(object, key));
/* or */
import has from 'has'; // https://www.npmjs.com/package/has
console.log(has(object, key));
  • 2.8 Prefer the object spread operator over Object.assign to shallow-copy objects. Use the object rest operator to get a new object with certain properties omitted.
// very bad
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 };
const copy = Object.assign(original, { c: 3 }); // this mutates `original` ಠ_ಠ
delete copy.a; // so does this

// bad
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 };
const copy = Object.assign({}, original, { c: 3 }); // copy => { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }

// good
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 };
const copy = { ...original, c: 3 }; // copy => { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }

const { a, ...noA } = copy; // noA => { b: 2, c: 3 }

Arrays

  • 3.1 Use the literal syntax for array creation.
// bad
const items = new Array();

// good
const items = [];
  • 3.2 Use Array#Push instead of direct assignment to add items to an array.
const someStack = [];

// bad
someStack[someStack.length] = 'abracadabra';

// good
someStack.push('abracadabra');
  • 3.3 Use array spreads ... to copy arrays.
// bad
const len = items.length;
const itemsCopy = [];
let i;

for (i = 0; i < len; i += 1) {
  itemsCopy[i] = items[i];
}

// good
const itemsCopy = [...items];
  • 3.4 To convert an iterable object to an array, use spreads ... instead of Array.from.
const foo = document.querySelectorAll('.foo');

// good
const nodes = Array.from(foo);

// best
const nodes = [...foo];
  • 3.5 Use Array.from for converting an array-like object to an array.
const arrLike = { 0: 'foo', 1: 'bar', 2: 'baz', length: 3 };

// bad
const arr = Array.prototype.slice.call(arrLike);

// good
const arr = Array.from(arrLike);
  • 3.6 Use Array.from instead of spread ... for mapping over iterables, because it avoids creating an intermediate array.
// bad
const baz = [...foo].map(bar);

// good
const baz = Array.from(foo, bar);
  • 3.7 Use return statements in array method callbacks. It’s ok to omit the return if the function body consists of a single statement returning an expression without side effects.
// good
[1, 2, 3].map((x) => {
  const y = x + 1;
  return x * y;
});

// good
[1, 2, 3].map((x) => x + 1);

// bad - no returned value means `acc` becomes undefined after the first iteration
[[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]].reduce((acc, item, index) => {
  const flatten = acc.concat(item);
});

// good
[[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]].reduce((acc, item, index) => {
  const flatten = acc.concat(item);
  return flatten;
});

// bad
inbox.filter((msg) => {
  const { subject, author } = msg;
  if (subject === 'Mockingbird') {
    return author === 'Harper Lee';
  } else {
    return false;
  }
});

// good
inbox.filter((msg) => {
  const { subject, author } = msg;
  if (subject === 'Mockingbird') {
    return author === 'Harper Lee';
  }

  return false;
});
  • 3.8 Use line breaks after open and before close array brackets if an array has multiple lines.
// bad
const arr = [
  [0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5],
];

const objectInArray = [{
  id: 1,
}, {
  id: 2,
}];

const numberInArray = [
  1, 2,
];

// good
const arr = [[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]];

const objectInArray = [
  {
    id: 1,
  },
  {
    id: 2,
  },
];

const numberInArray = [
  1,
  2,
];

Summary

Alright, that were useful JavaScript tips and tricks. I hope you've learned something new and you can go ahead to improve your code. If you sight anything wrong just let me know!
Thanks for reading.

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